Start at the top to prevent soil erosion

Mike Harding of Geosyntec Consultants creek-side near his home town in Indiana. Photo supplied by Mike Harding.

Mike Harding near his home town in Indiana. 

“Treat soil as a resource not a pollutant,” said Mike Harding of Geosyntec Consultants. It takes 10,000 years for nature to make an inch of topsoil. Harding explained, “Vegetation is the skin of the earth, and when vegetation is removed, the earth bleeds. That’s what we call erosion.” Behind population growth, the World Bank has recognized that conserving topsoil is the second biggest global challenge.

Harding urged anyone disturbing soils to:

  • Control water, beginning at the top of the slope
  • Prevent erosion by limiting the amount of area disturbed
  • Minimize erosion on all slopes
  • Do more than just install silt fence at slope bottoms

Silt fences and other sediment control devices do not prevent erosion. When property installed and maintained, they contain runoff and sedimentation before it can move offsite or pollute waterways.

Read more here.

Photo supplied by Mike Harding.

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About Sanne Kure-Jensen

Sanne Kure-Jensen is a frequent contributor to Country Folks, Country Folks Grower and Wine & Grape Grower bringing regional and national attention to agriculture in RI and across southern New England. She has also written for newsletters of the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA), Holistic Management International (HMI), RI Beekeepers Association and RI Tree Council. Read Sanne’s work at her Sustainable Living page at examiner.com. Sanne has written successful grant applications for alternative energy projects, staff and board training, products and services. Clients include agricultural businesses, farm stand/markets and non-profit organizations. Recent successful grant projects include a $90,000 USDA Rural Development‘s Rural Energy For America Program (REAP), $10,000 Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Farmer and $20,000 Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Conservation Innovation Grant (CIG). Sanne is the part-time Administrator for NOFA/RI, a Rhode Island Certified Horticulturist and beekeeper. She is a NOFA Accredited Organic Land Care Professional and has lectured across southern New England on Beekeeping, Native Pollinators and Ecological Landscape Design. Learn more about the NOFA’s Land Care programs or contact Sanne for a garden consultation through the NOFA/RI website.
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One Response to Start at the top to prevent soil erosion

  1. This information is great and I really like these words “Vegetation is the skin of the earth, and when vegetation is removed, the earth bleeds. That’s what we call erosion.” these types of words can really picked the readers interest. All of this information and tips are great. thanks for sharing

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